Parfum Satori

Scent and Sense in Japanese Culture/@ZHdK(日本文化の香りと感覚)

20181109conference2.jpg

9th/Nov/2018  スイス・チューリッヒ芸術大学<perfumative>にて講演しました。 後日、邦訳をアップします!


CONCLUSION

Translucent and without shape or form, I believe that in a post-modern sense, perfume can be regarded as Art. To enjoy "beauty with no form" is typical of Japanese aesthetic sensibilities. Today I would like to introduce everyone to a new way of looking at perfume through the eyes of Japanese culture.

 

Abstract

It has been said - that which is fleeting and ephemeral cannot be regarded as Art. However, this actually flies in the face of Japanese sensibilities because in our culture, "fragility" is highly valued. We can observe a contrast in how fragrances and perfumes are perceived in Japan and Europe. In my country, the preference is for light, delicate scents - fragrances that breathe, you could say. The Japanese market is known for being a "perfume wilderness." On the other hand, fabric conditioners are becoming as entrenched in Japanese society as they are abroad. Although differences in scent can be put down to differences in climate and dietary habits, it is also greatly due to our sense of aesthetics rooted in our culture. Hence, I will try to present a study regarding the differences in perceptions towards fragrance based on the following aspects:

 

1.  What is Art?

2.  Artistry in traditional Japanese Culture

3.  Is Japan a perfume wilderness?


20181109conference2.jpg

1.What is Art?

When I received the theme for this speech, it gave me the opportunity to reconsider the relationship between scent and Art. First of all, I would like pose a question - what is Art?

It is said that in the West, "art is expected to have eternal qualities."

If permanence is a condition, then how long must a work of Art exist to be regarded as permanent? 

From the point of view of the Cosmos, one hundred years, one thousand years are just brief moments in time where everything with "form and shape" is destined to disappear.

 If that is the case, then to have form does not automatically mean permanence.

I believe that a work of Art is a medium that links "the artist or creator" to "the viewer." The artist discovers the beauty around them and expresses their awe, which the viewer picks up on.

Art does not lie within a picture or a sculpture. Art lies within the "viewer" themself. If the viewer has no sense of beauty, even the most sophisticated piece of Art is tantamount to garbage.


The Japanese sensibility towards Art is to appreciate what lies beyond mere shape and form and cherish it for posterity. That is why it is easy for the Japanese to consider scent - which is formless and invisible - as Art. 

20160613annindriya3-2.jpg

 "Time" is in a constant state of flux. Even though we may meet the same person in the very same place, each encounter is special. We call this一期一会(ichi-go-ichi-e/one opportunity, one encounter.

Whatever or whomever we encounter, it is a once in a lifetime experience. I believe that "eternity" manifests when you are living to your utmost in every single moment.  



2.Art in traditional Japanese culture

 "Dou" or "way" is one of the most typical Japanese aesthetics in traditional culture. If permanence is sought for in Art, then flower arrangement "Kadoh," the tea ceremony "Sadoh" and the way of incense "Koudoh" can certainly be regarded as Art.

I would like to take time here to introduce Kadoh and Sadoh and talk a little about my background with a particular focus on "harmony" and "permanence."

 flower arrangement west.jpg

2-1Kadoh - Flower Arranging

Nothing is as soothing or reassuring as flowers.

When I was a little girl, I would carry a pocket-sized book of flora with me on my way to and from school. My mother ran her own flower arranging school at home and I used to mimic her.

 

There are many differences between Japanese Kadoh and Western flower arranging. Simply put, Western flower-arrangement involves combining a whole host of flowers to fill a space. 

Japanese Ikebana, however, is the opposite. Flowers and plants are used to a minimum to express one part of a space. In Ikebana, we consider tree shapes and add leaves to create an arrangement that reflects the elegance of Nature.

 

japanese kado.jpg

The more you learn about the ins and outs of Kadoh, you realize that in order to optimize the beauty of the flowers you are using, you have to remember the importance of harmony within the whole.

I adopt the same policy when I prepare fragrances. Even though a floral fragrance may be at the forefront, I have to combine proper quantities of a top note that will draw out the main scent and a last note that will support it in order faithfully express the mood of the flowers and natural scenery.

Furthermore, I must remember that perfume serves to color a single scene of a person's life, so the fragrance must co-exist in harmony with person who wears it and their environment.

 

The life of a flower is extremely short - and that is why it has gained the status of immortality. It blooms in the morning and wilts in the evening. This fragility carries with it a sadness, which the Japanese sensibility regards with affection. 

It favors the practice of finding the beauty within the transient, within the impermanent. To regret the passing of something that is dear to you is an essential part of the Japanese character.  

 

When one is enveloped in a momentary fragrance, the emotions you experience are themselves "immortal."

 

chashitsu_tea_house.jpg

2-2The Tea Ceremony or "Sadoh"


I started to learn how to conduct the Tea Ceremony when I was 12. Although I looked forward to tasting the tea and the Japanese sweets, when I recall the lessons, the scent of incense and the sound of boiling water in the serene, bright tearoom come flooding back.

 

People, flowers, light, the iron pot, the room itself combine in harmony to create a sense of Art.

 

For example, if the tea ceremony existed merely to quench one's thirst, it would not be regarded as Art. Instead, it is the ceremonial practice of preparing the tea that quenches the thirst within your heart. In the same way, for example, Kaiseki course cuisine does not exist merely to satisfy hunger. One's heart is warmed by the immaculate service provided.

 

Therefore, perfume is not just another consumer item. To wear a fragrance means to sense the beauty within a particular time and space. Rather than wearing an assertive fragrance, one should think more of co-existing in harmony with one's environment and conducting oneself in an elegant manner. This is a major aesthetic of the Japanese culture.

 

Genji.jpg 


2-3 The History of Fragrance in Japan

 

  In the West, perfume has been 

"inextricably linked to the body, which was long considered the abominable garment of the soul." ( Pope Gregory Great)

 In Japan, it is used to cleanse the impurity of one's body.

Perfume originated in Europe where there is a long history of applying a liquid fragrance to one's skin. After a long period of self-imposed isolation, Japan opened itself once again to the world during the Meiji Era. Consequently, the history of Western perfume in Japan is still only 150 years old and still lags behind Europe in this respect.

Having said which, Japan has a long history of room fragrance using solidified incense.

The history of incense in Japan can be traced back to the introduction of Buddhism in the sixth century. Eventually it was incorporated into court culture as a sophisticated pastime.

In the 8th century, dyes called "ko-zome" using aromatic ingredients such as cloves or cinnamon were used to dye silk. Not only were the silks beautiful to the eye, the fibers emanated a fragrance and luxurious clothes for the nobility were made from them. The Kimonos, warmed by body heat, would give off a fragrance when the wearer moved.


The Japanese literary classic "The Tale of Genji" was written in the 11th century. One memorable section of the book describes a scene where incense was burnt to infuse the cloth of the Kimono with scent. This scent is used to explain the background and the feelings of the characters in the story.

In the Samurai culture of the 15th century, the incense ceremony was established to heighten spirituality. During this time, various disciplines were carried out to encourage mental training. As a result, this laid the foundations for a unique Japanese culture that seeks to enhance education and artistry.


Buddhist altar.jpg

Even today, most Japanese houses have a Buddhist altar to honor their ancestors and will burn incense every morning and every evening. Japanese people are well acquainted with the aroma of incense from their childhood days.

Although this affinity for scent is different from applying an alcohol-based liquid directly to the skin, a culture centered around fragrance has evolved in Japan, too.  

Incense not only expresses the sense of smell but the sense of hearing as well. We physically sense the aromatic molecules through our noses and at the same time, our heart hears the story the fragrance is telling us.

Scent does not speak in a loud voice. As it is made up of aromatic elements, we sense "beauty" rather than defining it as a "good" fragrance.

Aromatic wood possesses a history of 1400 years, incense 1000 years and the incense ceremony 600 years. Scent has developed hand in hand with religion, literature and education in Japan. Japanese aesthetics have honored the spirituality rather than the physicality of fragrance.




japanese cuisine.jpg

2-4. Japanese food and scent

The Japanese fragrance culture is not just centered around aromatic trees or incense. From season to season, the scents that Nature brings us are the bounty from the sea and the mountains.

Although Japanese cuisine was first introduced to Europe over four hundred years ago, it took a while for its true nature to be appreciated. Japanese cuisine found recognition at last in 2013 and was designated as a UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage.

 

However, it is not just the ingredients of Japanese food that have found approval -the food culture that surrounds it that has been appreciated as an Art.

 

Stretching from South to North, the four seasons are very distinct in Japan. We enjoy the beauty of the constantly changing seasons, respect our many annual events and pay much attention to the ingredients and tableware that we use. At face value, although Japanese cuisine appears to be simple, its preparation is, in fact, deceptively intricate.

Just as this penchant for delicacy in flavor has been understood throughout the world, I believe that in the future a deeper understanding of Japanese scent will grow, too.


 

 2-5. A question from France

 Before I arrived here in Switzerland, I was interviewed by a French TV network. I thought everyone might be interested in this particular question, so I will answer it here.

 

Q.And the question was: "I have heard that Japanese people are very sensitive when it comes to odor and that strong perfumes are unpopular. What then are the most popular fragrances for men and women?"


My Answer,

 Well, rather than a particular fragrance or ingredient, Japanese people tend to prefer general scents that are dry or airy.

 Some of the most popular scents are citrus-based notes, which are light and simple and express a love of the seasons. In fact Japan is home to an abundance of citrus fruits including Yuzu, Kabosu, and Sudachi, which are all used in Japanese cuisine. Each fruit has its own distinct fragrance.

 

The woody note of the agarwood used in the incense ceremony is spicy, warm and dry and acts as a cleanser of the heart.

During the Incense Ceremony, a small piece of lit charcoal is placed in the ash of the incense burner. It is covered with a Mica plate and a piece of agarwood is put on top of it. However, the agarwood is not burnt. By indirectly warming aromatic wood, its perfume is released into the air in a milder fashion and gently surrounds the incense burner.

This is an alternative method of diffusing scent different to that of using ethanol. Indeed I have tried to create scents that express the indirect soft light from Shoji, paper windows.

 


3-1. The Perfume Wilderness

What we can glean from this Questionnaire

These are the results of a research regarding perfume (Image Source: Marsh)


Only 8.4% of those questioned wore perfume everyday. People who "often" wear perfume also accounted for 8.4%.

40% of women and 60% of the men questioned said they never wear perfume at all.

This is why Japan is often regarded internationally as a "Perfume Wilderness."

On the other hand, the demand for fabric conditioners and room deodorant is expanding at a similar rate to Europe and the USA.

Many Japanese women said they were attracted to "fragrance" even if they do not wear perfume. However, this does not refer to essential oils. Many end users said that they often spend up to an hour walking around a supermarket sniffing aromatic agents and fabric conditioners.

So, in spite of having an affinity for scent, why has Western style perfume not taken root in Japan?

That is because the reasons for wearing scent is completely different, which in turn leads to the approach towards the consumers as well differs.

 

3-2. Reason why

For instance, in Japan, perfume is not worn to attract the opposite sex.

Western advertising tends to contain sexual or fashion-based messages for perfume and this type of advertising generally appeals to established users. However, most Japanese wear perfume for their own satisfaction and I believe this is genderless.   

 

Secondly, Japanese people seek out perfume to create harmony with those around them.

Japanese people may want to keep a distance from overpowering Western fragrances. As I mentioned in my section on the Japanese tea ceremony, there is a respect for maintaining an overall balance and harmony.

Relaxation and calm is born from a love of the seasons and the Japanese appreciate the atmosphere and mood produced by perfume.


 rain.jpg


Thirdly, there is the question of humidity.

 

Most perfumes on sale in Japan were manufactured in the West. However, due to the influence of climate, the fragrance they give off is different.

The air in Japan tends to wrap itself around you and encase odor, which means that European fragrances come across as too aggressive. This is because they were created in accordance with dryer climates.

 

As Japanese people value harmony above self-expression, many perceive perfume with suspicion and even actively dislike it.

 

Although Japan has the capacity to accept scent as Art, the sexual and fashion-related image of Western culture has struggled to establish itself there. This is why I decided to create Japanese-style perfume.

 

 3-3. Japanese-style blending and the world

 

New perfumes are created not through seeking out unusual fragrances, but through new accords of standard ingredients. If Japan has recourses, it is in its understanding of culture. I would like people to understand the story behind matter - history and lifestyles, for example.

 

I believe that perfumes should be created for local, not global tastes. Instead of basic and uniform fragrances, scents should become more personal. 

From the viewpoint of diversity and inclusion, niche perfumes can contribute to worldwide abundance, which in turn will no doubt lead to more people enjoying the wonder of perfume.


globe.jpg





.In Conclusion

Although Western Art values that which is permanent, true permanence can actually only be found in that which has no form - that is the Japanese perspective on Art. 

 

 "Fragrance is more than a fashion accessory and is worth a theoretical reflection. It becomes a paradigmatic form of the time."

 

When I received the theme of this meeting, I felt an affinity towards this new western wave.

I believe the possibilities of perfume are limitless, because more than any other kind of Art, it penetrates the soul.

 

Thank you so much for listening to my speech today. I would like to extend my gratitude to everyone involved in the organization of this event. 


20181109conference3.jpg



バイオレット調香体験教室11月24日(土) Parfum satori fragrance school

120411スミレ.jpg


今回は、新しい香り、バイオレットの調香体験を行います!

「バイオレット(すみれ)」は花の香料の中でも5大フローラルのひとつにあげられます。ふんわりと甘く粉っぽい、優しい香りです。


意外や、男性用香水の隠し味にも使われる香りなんですよ!



今までに、ローズ、ジャスミンの体験講座にご参加いただきました方々も、ぜひ新しい香料を学びにいらしてください!



日程: 11月24(土)午後13時30分から約90分 

場所: パルファンサトリ 2階 アトリエ (六本木)

受講料・教材費: 10,000(10,800円税込)  (要予約)

締め切り: 11月20日(火)

定員: 5名


一般に手にする事の出来ない単品香料を使って、香水を調香してみましょう。

香水がどのようなものでできているのか、どのように作られるのか、

疑問にお答えします!

また、お作りいただいた香り(バイオレットの香り1/2オンス(15cc))は、

香水瓶(ケース付)に詰めてお持ち帰りいただきます。


パルファン サトリ フレグランススクールにご興味のある方は是非ご参加ください!

2019年1月スタート、「フレグランスデザイン講座」の申し込み受付中です!


申込み⇒お問い合わせメール

※お問い合わせメールでのお申し込みには

 ①お名前②ご住所③お電話番号
 を必ずご記入ください。

 受講受付の返信メールをもって申込み完了となります。

161029体験.jpg



ジャスミン体験.jpg


106-0032 東京都港区六本木3-6-8 OURS 2F    

TEL 03-5797-7241 

 最寄駅からの順路➤地下鉄南北線 「六本木一丁目」駅 西改札より徒歩3分

     または➤地下鉄日比谷線、大江戸線 「六本木」駅 3番出口より徒歩7分


     ※矢印の順路は、坂がなく歩きやすいルートです。↓
パルファンサトリ地図map小.jpg


ノーベル賞 金貨 Nobel coin chocolate

181008Nobelcoin.jpg

ノーベル賞のメダルをかたどったコインチョコレート。スウェーデン、ストックホルムのお土産でいただいた。


コインチョコレートと言えば、子供のころ親によく買ってもらった。赤いネットに3センチくらいのコインがジャラジャラと入って、とっても嬉しかったのを覚えている。


181008Nobelcoin2.jpg

このコインチョコレートは直径約6センチ、ずっと大きくて、紅茶とセットになっておしゃれな缶に入っている。ノーベル博物館限定のミュージアムグッズだそう。

金色の箔をはがすと、ただの黒いチョコレートなのだけど・・・。

IMG_2006.jpg


ノーベル賞の受賞者は、「ノーベル・レクチャー」と呼ばれる記念講演を授賞式のあとで行う。

チョコレートを食べながら、川端康成がノーベル文学賞を取った時に講演した「美しい日本の私」を思いだして読む。


「美しい日本と私」ではなく、「美しい日本の私」というタイトルが、とても日本的だと思う。















桂(カツラ)の葉はしょうゆの匂い,Cercidiphyllum japonicum

181012katsura8.jpg

「桂(かつら)の木の枯葉は甘辛い、しょうゆの匂いがするんですよ」


半年以上前になるだろうか。生徒さんがビニール袋にカツラの落ち葉をたくさん入れて持ってきてくれた。なるほど、パリパリに乾いた落ち葉からは、ほんのりあまじょっぱいようなにおいがする。


彼女の家のお庭には、お母様が丹精をこめた香料植物が植えてある。ときどき、色々な花や素材を持ってきてくれるのである。




そういえば、新宿御苑の池のほとりに大きな桂の木があったはず。いずれ見に行こう、、、と思いつつ忘れていた。


181012katsura9.jpg


10月になり、すっかり涼しくなった。ある日、ふと1本の樹が目に留まった。ここはよく通るかかる道。

春、桜の時期は満開の花でにぎわって、この木には気がつかなかったのだけれども、遠くから樹勢と木肌を見て『桂の木では?』とピンと来るところがあり、近寄ってみた。



181012katsura2.jpg

やはり、桂の木だ。


調べると、桂の木にキャラメルのような甘い香りがあるということは割に知られているらしい。

181012katsura11.jpg

剪定された後に近くを通ると、切り口から出た成分が揮発して匂ったり、葉が枯れるにつれ、香りが生成されるという。

この成分はマルトール(Maltol)である。マルトールは、綿菓子の香りのする香料で、香水にもよく使う。


落ち葉を拾って手の中で崩してみる。葉そのものの香りよりも、木の傍を歩いていて、あるかなきかに香ってくるほうがよくわかると思う。



181012katsura10.jpg

このあたりは桜並木が続いているので、あたりには桜の落ち葉もいっぱい。カサコソと積もる落ち葉を踏みしめて歩くと、桜の葉のクマリン(Coumarine)の優しい香りも漂ってくる。



満開の桜並木を思い出しながら、紅葉の並木を歩く。
わずか半年でもたくさんのことがあった。

『自分はどこへ吹かれていくのだろうか・・・』などと感傷的になるのも秋の空気のなせるわざか。

冬もまだなのに、春が待ち遠しく思える朝なのである。








木綿のハンカチーフ handkerchief

181006handkerchie.jpg


「木綿のハンカチーフ」
こんなお題の名曲があったが、その話ではない。

ハンカチは白がいい。それも、メンズの大きめのハンカチが好きである。織り模様はあまり凝っていないものがよい。


次に、白地に白のレエスとか、白地に白の刺繍入りも好みである。若いころはスワトウのハンカチをたくさん持っていた。

和光のショーケースに並ぶ、繊細なスイスレースのハンカチーフにうっとりとみとれつつ、お値段にため息をついてあきらめたのも一回二回ではない。

ハンカチは消耗品である。この小さな50センチ四方の布に、上等のものを使うのは本当に贅沢だと思う。



昔は、ハンカチはギフトとして贈ったり贈られたりしたものであるが、最近はさっぱりそのような戴きものをしない。いまは、どこへ行っても化粧室にペーパーナプキンやハンドドライヤーが常備されているからであろう。

薄いハンカチで手を拭いても、すぐに濡れてしまうし、衛生面を考えたらその方が合理的なのかもしれない。


私がハンカチを持っている理由は、行儀が悪く食べこぼしをよくするので、もっぱらおひざかけとして使うことが多い。白いシャツを着ていて、トマトソースのパスタを食べるときは、胸元から下げて、エプロンのようにすることもある。


普段着の時は、着ているものよりハンカチの方を汚さないように食べたりするのが、本末転倒で自分ながらおかしいと思うのである。







2014年の記事から➣夏目漱石の小説「三四郎」のなかで、美禰子が白いハンカチにつけていた香水の名がヘリオトロープ。日本に輸入された初期の香水のひとつと言われている。

「手帛(ハンケチ)が三四郎の顔の前にきた。鋭い香がぷんとする。『ヘリオトロープ』と女が静かに云った。三四郎は思わず顔を後へ引いた。ヘリオトロープの壜。四丁目の夕暮。迷羊(ストレイシープ)迷羊(ストレイシープ)。空には高い日が明かに懸る。」ー三四郎から







-スタッフ募集-

ただいまは、週に2-3日ほどお勤めできる方を募集しております。

○香りが好きで興味のある方
○英語のできる方

このたびはラボのアシスタントの募集ではありません。
詳細は、面談の折お話しさせていただきます。

ご興味のある方は、問い合わせメールにて連絡ください。



(返信メールが届かない場合がありますので、必ず電話番号も記入してください。PCメールの受信設定もご確認ください)











-香りが好きでお仕事したい方を募集中- recruit_parfum_satori

20170927店内写真2.jpg


弊社は、オーナーであり、調香師の大沢さとりが代表を務める会社です。

日本の美、歴史、奥ゆかしさ、そして四季これらをコンセプトに自ら調香、デザイン、オリジナルブランドとして販売をしています。

ただいまは、週に2-3日ほどお勤めできる方を募集しております。


○香りが好きで興味のある方
○英語のできる方



このたびは調香アシスタントの募集ではありません。
詳細は、面談の折お話しさせていただきます。
ご興味のある方は、問い合わせメールにて連絡ください。



(返信メールが届かない場合がありますので、必ず電話番号も記入してください。PCメールの受信設定もご確認ください)

ジャスミンの調香体験教室10月20日(土) Parfum satori fragrance school

100703jasmine.jpg


調香体験講座のお知らせです。

今回は、ジャスミンの体験講座です!


「ジャスミン」は花の香料の中でも4大フローラルのひとつにあげられます。

般に手にする事の出来ない単品香料を使って、香水を調香してみましょう。


香水がどのようなものでできているのか、どのように作られるのか、

疑問にお答えします!


また、お作りいただいた香り(ジャスミンの香り1/2オンス(15cc))は、

香水瓶(ケース付)に詰めてお持ち帰りいただきます。

パルファン サトリ フレグランススクールにご興味のある方は是非ご参加ください!


日程: 10月20(土)午後13時30分から約90分 

場所: パルファンサトリ 2階 アトリエ 

受講料・教材費: 10,000(10,800円税込)  (要予約)

締め切り: 10月16日(火)

定員: 5名


申込み⇒お問い合わせメール


※お問い合わせメールでのお申し込みには

 ①お名前②ご住所③お電話番号
 を必ずご記入ください。

 受講受付の返信メールをもって申込み完了となります。


20161025体験受講.jpg


ジャスミンの調香体験は、今回が年内では最後になるかと思います!

11月24日はまた別の香りの体験講座をおこないます!12月は開講予定がありませんのでご注意ください。


106-0032 東京都港区六本木3-6-8 OURS 2F    

TEL 03-5797-7241 

 最寄駅からの順路➤地下鉄南北線 「六本木一丁目」駅 西改札より徒歩3分

     または➤地下鉄日比谷線、大江戸線 「六本木」駅 3番出口より徒歩7分


     ※矢印の順路は、坂がなく歩きやすいルートです。↓
パルファンサトリ地図map小.jpg


Creating Oribe /Matcha fragrance 織部の香りのできるまで

20171003織部.jpg

 

  People often ask me what comes first - the name or a fragrance. It's really case-by-case.

 

  Sometimes I decide upon a theme and the fragrance is formulated as I work towards it. On other occasions, I struggle to find an appropriate name once the perfume is complete. My working name for this particular fragrance was Matcha (a powdered green tea used in Japanese tea ceremonies), and its official name came later. Matcha struck me as being somewhat unimaginative and after jotting down and erasing several ideas, it was the name "Oribe" that came to me.

 

  Furuta Oribe was one of the major disciples of the celebrated tea master Rikyū in the 16th century. Although he conducted tea ceremonies in the manner of his master, he was also known for loyally keeping the spirit of his master's teaching,  "Always try something different." Oribe was bold and liberated in character and introduced a new sensibility of beauty into the world of tea, bringing about hugely popular gardening methods, architecture and porcelain that were referred to as

  "in the taste of Oribe." The green and black designs of tea sets over 400-years-old are novel and unique even today.


20150609織部焼香合2.jpg


  I can't exactly remember when I first heard the name Oribe, but I know it was when my mother was talking to me about her tea utensils. I officially entered the "Way of Tea" (Chadō/Sadō) when I was twelve-years old. As I came into contact with the tea ceremony - either with my master or with my mother - stories regarding Furuta Oribe found a place within me, and led to the naming of a fragrance several decades later. Therefore, I must also credit my mother.

 

  I started to read more about Oribe after naming the perfume. The famed author Ryōtarō Shiba praises him, "In the world of formative art, he was probably the first person with a sensibility for the avant-garde."

 

  Some people have asked me why I named this fragrance Oribe instead of Rikyū. Although a flash of inspiration isn't reliant on logic, I could put it down to the fact that Oribe isn't as well known as Rikyū. I wanted to "try something different."

 

With my fragrance "Satori," I not only strived to recreate the aroma of agar wood, I also wanted to manifest the appearance of an elegant woman in the purity of a Japanese-style room. In the same way, the fragrance of Oribe goes beyond embodying the refreshing aroma of Japanese tea, it represents the spiritually of practitioners of the Japanese tea ceremony.

 

  The slight bitterness comes from cis-Jasmin, which is a single aroma used in Jasmine Note to create a bitterness and astringency.

 

  For flavor, I included Violet leaf.abs. Although Violet leaf is said to resemble cucumber, I think its aroma is closer to that of dry ingredients such as kelp extract.

 

  A refreshing green aroma can be a little one-dimensional, so I added body with floral elements.     

141120茶の花.jpg

 

  The tea tree, the Sasanqua and camellia japonica all belong to the camellia family. The Sasanqua blossoms in late autumn, the camellia in spring and tea flowers in December. Tea flowers are charming, like small white camellia blooms and their aroma is delightful. The fragrance resembles that of Sasanqua and also Hedion. Hedion is an essence that contains elements of Jasmine. This is why Tea Note and Jasmine are extremely compatible.

  I added Jasmin abs. to boost the floral volume.

  I included Iris butter and other natural essences to recreate the foamy and powdery sensation of making a light tea. I was aiming for something more complex than a plain green-type aroma.



20161023毎朝の一服.jpg


  I observe a ritual of drinking Matcha every morning at home. Preparing Matcha for myself when I wake up makes me alert and ready for the day. Enjoying the beginning of the day like this is akin to an appreciation of the seasons.


  In the world of tea, there is a November rite called "switching to a winter furnace" and utensils named after Oribe are traditionally utilized at this time. I hope that this Oribe fragrance will bring you enjoyment in times of reflection.



 


Parfum Satori  Oribe  EDP

日本語バージョンは次のページ↓

古い腕時計 ROLEX watch

20180807rorex.jpg

 1.5センチ角くらいの、古い腕時計である。
小ぶりのケースで、龍頭(りゅうず)と尾錠(びじょう)にクラウンのマークが入っていてとても可愛らしい。

 ひと昔前は、ロレックスはメンズというイメージがあったが、これはクラッシックな雰囲気のあるレディスウォッチで気に入っている。


20180910watchbelt4.jpg


 この時計を、3年ほど前にオーバーホールに出した。下の写真はその時に撮ってもらったものだ。時計の中はいつもうっとりするほど美しい。機能のすぐれたものは、見た目も美しいものである。

 修理をしたのはスイスの「オーディマピゲ(AUDEMARS PIGUET、略:AP)」で修行した日本人の時計職人で、吉田圭さんと言う。

 20180808RorexYkk.jpg
 
 彼はもともと、私に香水のオーダーメイドを依頼しに来たお客様である。(今は受けていないが)2004年くらいだったと思う。あまりに若い方なので、初めは当惑した。香水のオーダーは安い買い物ではない。
 しかしよくよく話をしてみると、モノづくりに真剣な時計職人としての姿勢に「この方なら」と思い、ありがたく作らせていただくことにした。
 
 以来、リピートで時々来店されていたが、ある日「日本の仕事を辞めて、スイスのAPで修行する」との知らせを聞いた。若者の挑戦に感動した。

 
 パリからニースへ行く飛行機はスイスの端を超えていく。「私がフランスに行ったときは寄ってみたい」などと言っていたが機会が合わないまま、やがて彼はオーディマピゲでの修行を終え、帰国。
 銀座にあるスイスの時計ブランド、ウブロ(HUBLOT)で仕事をしていたが、いまは一家を構え、「独立時計師」として静岡に「YSK Watch Instruments」という自分の会社を持っている。

 長い知己なので、その変遷(へんせん)を振り返ると感無量である。
 
 私の他の腕時計も何点か修理をお願いしたが、とても丁寧な仕事で、気難しい時計もきちんと動いて帰ってきた時はとても嬉しかった。
 どんな業界でも、本当に腕のいい職人さんに出会うのは稀で、幸せなことである。

 アトリエには自分で設計した特殊な工作機械もあるというので、いつか見学に行きたいと思っている。

 
20180910watchbelt3.jpg


 オーバーホールのあと、この時計はたまにつける程度でしまっていることが多かったのだが、あまり使わないのも良くないと聞いて、今年になってからはこの時計をよくつける。肩が凝らないのがいい。
 ただ、いまの私には文字盤が小さすぎ、時間を見るのには役に立っていないので、ほとんどブレスレットの代わりである。

 7、8月はとても暑かったため、汗でずいぶんベルトがくたびれてしまった。
ようやく気温が下がったので、銀座に行ったついでに、ヨレヨレになった時計のベルトを和光で取り換えてもらった。古びて馴染んだ皮に比べて新しいものは少し固い。

 交換後、さっそくつけて尾錠を強く締めていたら、「少し緩くしたほうが良いですよ」とお店の方が教えてくれた。つけなおしながら「なぜ?」と聞くと、ぴったりすると皮が汗の水分を吸ってしまうからだそう。

 皮のベルトが劣化したのは、暑いせいだけではなく、つけ方にも問題があった。

 なにごともゆとりと風通しが必要か。


20180910watchbelt2.jpg


 つけてみるとやはりベルトが新しいからパリッとした感じ。色も臙脂(エンジ)からこげ茶になり、手元も気分もすっかり秋モードである。



YSK Watch Instruments➣ https://ysk-watch-instruments.com/

 










パルファン サトリの「フレグランススクール」生徒さんの声


■入学2017年 「ジュニア香水ソムリエ®通信講座」 【通信】 大泉さん(30代)


20180204大泉さん.jpg

香水に興味を持ったきっかけ

 中学生のときに「モテたい」と思い、興味をもったのが一番最初のきっかけです。最初は流行りの香水をつけていましたが、みんな同じ香りをつけていたので、人とかぶらない香水をさがすようになりメゾンフレグランスと出会いました。さらに、あるメゾンの香水ショップに足を運んだ際に、香水のクリエーションの背景や世界観に魅力を感じ面白いと思いました。



なぜパルファン サトリを選んだのですか?

 日本の文化をクリエーションのベースにしているという「日本の香水ブランド」というところに興味を持ちました。「香水」という海外からきたモノを、日本人のパフューマーが表現したときにどのような違いがあるのかなどと考え、文化を香りにしているさとり先生から香水について勉強したいと思いました。

流行りの香水をただ使っている、という人がまだまだ多いと思います。香水について言葉で伝えられるようになり、もっと香水の魅力を広められたらと思い、香りの表現・提案を学べる香水ソムリエの受講を決めました。



実際に通ってみての感想20180204大泉さん2.jpg

 講座では香料のことも学ぶことができます。今は香水販売の仕事をしているのですが、香りに詳しいお客様と香料について話すこともでき、香りの表現はもちろんですが、それ以外にも勉強したことが役立っています。また、テキストには香りに関係した花々の資料があるので、それもとても勉強になっています。


香水の勉強をはじめて変わったこと、香りに意識が向いてよかったこと

 インターネットなどで見る新作フレグランスなど自分が試したことのない香水を、表記しているノートや香調の説明、ボトルのデザインも含め、こんな香りかなとイメージできるようになったのが楽しいです。

あとは、感性が豊かになったと思います。それは嗅覚に関係することだけではなく、講座で行うコラージュなどを通して色から感じ取られるイメージについて考える機会が増えたからだと思います。






   パルファン サトリ「フレグランススクール」➤ http://parfum-satori.com/jp/school/

   「フレグランススクール」に関連するブログ➤ http://parfum-satori.com/blog/cat235/

パフューマー・大沢さとり

「パルファン サトリ」は、フランス調香師協会会員・SATORI(大沢さとり)の香水ブランドです。コレクションはすべてSATORI自身の処方により調合された特別感のある香り。初めて香水を試される方や、外国の強い香水に疲れた方にもお勧めです。日本の気候と情緒に合う、優しくおだやかな香りをお楽しみください。

SATORI'S ピックアップ

パルファンサトリのオススメ商品や関連ブログ記事などをご紹介いたします。

最新作☆新緑の風と芳醇な樽の香り <br/> Mizunara -ミズナラ‐

最新作☆新緑の風と芳醇な樽の香り 
 Mizunara -ミズナラ‐

ミズナラの「新緑の風」と「芳醇な樽(たる)」の香りが組み合わされた、男性におすすめのフレグランスです。

六本木アトリエ・ショップのご案内

六本木アトリエ・ショップのご案内

みなさまのご来店を心からお待ちしております☆

東京都港区六本木3-6-8-2F

Tel 03-5797-7241

オードパルファン<br />SATORI(さとり)

オードパルファン
SATORI(さとり)

同じ重さの黄金より価値のある、最高の沈香木・伽羅の香りを表現したパルファン サトリの代表作品です。

フレグランスデザイン講座 <br/>パルファンサトリ

フレグランスデザイン講座 
パルファンサトリ

調香を学び、オリジナルの香りを作る講座です

抹茶の香り<br/>織部(おりべ)

抹茶の香り
織部(おりべ)

ほろ苦い抹茶のグリーンとふわっとした泡立ち。すっきりとした甘さが残ります。

>

カテゴリ

月別 アーカイブ